How to protect your privacy in Android with App Ops

Privacy on Android has always been an issue debated consequently and when permission is, there are a lot of cases of malware on Google Play related to them. Since Android 4.3 the situation changed thanks to App Ops, but this solution is almost accidental to Google.

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When it comes to sensitive information, who use your smartphone as a life partner or companion in our profession,we run the risk of carrying all the time in the pocket a lot of personal data in the wrong hands can cause us great harm, by therefore, the more conscious, use a PIN or a password for access to it, and some even encrypt your phone.

But what happens when we want to protect our data from certain applications we have installed on our smartphone? installed the latest title in the signature game that fascinates you, but do not want the game to have access to information such as your address book or your location. When you install an application on your smartphone you are enabling certain permissions to make this work the way it was intended, these permissions are those that facilitate access to certain of our own smartphone functions and data from other apps.

Privacy Android is a hotly debated issue , as many developers taking advantage of the permission system in Android, including certain permissions that were not related to the main function of your application, in order to take over private user information or infect your phone with malware . The only alternatives were against this scenario: install the application, if you really endure the permits we needed-we-calling, or find another alternative and avoid apps with permissions rare . Finally, the landscape of privacy Android changed in recent months, particularly after the departure of Android 4.3 , thanks to a feature called App Ops . But in her short life, and this feature has an interesting history.

AppOps

With the release of Android 4.3 was given the possibility to the user to take control of the privacy of your data, allowing you to remove certain apps permissions granted at the time of installation. You do not want an application designed to be a simple image viewer has permission to access the microphone, your contacts, your location, the WiFi or timing? No problem! It’s just a matter of turning off from a list of permissions.

After the latest update of Android (4.4.2), many users complained of not being able to access the function of App Ops, and the truth of the matter is really obnoxious. As we reported Android Police , the fact is thatGoogle planned at any time give the end user this tool , App Ops was designed to be used only internally by testers and a tool for debugging .

Thanks to the dev Color Tiger, we can regain control of privacy on Android with its latest application, which brings to App Ops life, and even with a vitamin choice. Best of all, the app is free on Google Play . If you want more control over the permissions on your apps, or have installed Android 4.4.2, the best you can do is to root your smartphone and install AppOpsX , which is vitamin enriched version with extra features.

There are several alternatives Play Google to see if any of them were to not work. As reported by Phone Arena , they can tryAppOps Sylvain Galand , or App Ops Team Lars .

The reality is that nobody knows for sure what the future of this type of functions that privilege to the end user in control of your privacy in Android, except the same Google . As it is true that App Ops was destined never to see the light beyond the internal use, probably the best we can hope for is that somehow is enabled for apps developers. Personally I would love to see Google take a firm step, protecting their users, who instead saw gave them back.

[app]com.findsdk.apppermission&hl=en[/app]
[app]fr.slvn.appops[/app]

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